ASIAN SKIN

  • Asian skin is considered to be one of the most sensitive skin types. It has fewer hair follicles and, thus, a smoother surface. It also is firmer over the general bone structure and has greater elasticity, both of benefit when growing older. Unfortunately it can be hyperpigmentation. The damage that we see on a person’s skin actually starts many years before it is noticeable. It may be that the person was over exposure to sun and or heat at some stage and DNA in a single melannocyte was damaged. If the DNA controlling the production of melanin is affected, then the melannocyte makes an excessive amount of melanin. The cell, in fact, has lost control of melanin formation. Over time this single cell multiplies and gradually grows into a visible patch of cells that is making more melanin than the surrounding skin.

WHAT CAUSE OF THE AGING AND HOW TO PREVENT THEM:

A certain amount of sun exposure is necessary to create vitamin D, a regulator of calcium and phosphorous levels in the blood. Excessive exposure, however, can lead to long-term damage such as premature aging, age spots and skin cancer.

AVOID THE SUN

Aging of the skin is process influenced by intrinsic (internal) and extrinsic (external) factors that lead to aging skin. Such as sun exposure, the environment, health habits and general lifestyle

The most damaging extrinsic factor to avoid are sun and smoking. Photoaging from the sun results in freckles, age spot rough and leathery skin, fine lines, wrinkles, uneven complexion and skin cancer. The sun it ultraviolet (UV) rays have greatest impact on how our skin ages. Approximately 80 to 85 percent of our aging is caused by the ray of the skin. As we age, the collagen and elastin filbers of the skin naturally weaken. This weakening happens at a much faster rate when the skin is frequently exposed to ultraviolet rays. The UV rays of the skin reach the skin in two different forms as UVA and UVB rays. Each of the rays influence the skin at different levels. UVA rays is called the “aging rays’ contribute 90-95 percent of the skin ultraviolet rays that in each surface. These rays weaken the skin’s collagen and elastin fibers, causing wrinkling and sagging in the tissue. UVB rays also referred to as the

burning rays” cause tanning of the skin be affecting the melanocytes, the cells of the epidermis that are responsible for producing melanin. Melanin is designed to help protect the skin from the sun’s UV ray, but can be altered or destroyed when large frequent doses of UV lights are allowed to penetrate the skin. Although UVB penetration is not as deep as UVA, these rays are equally damaging to the skin and damaging the eyes as well. On the positive more UVB ray contribute to the body’s synthesis of vitamin D and other important mineral.

HYPERPIGMENTATION

HYPERPIGMENTATION TREATMENT

SENSITIVE SKIN WITH PIGMENTATION

According to research, fifty percent of all women worldwide consider themselves to have sensitive facial skin. Asian skin is considered to be one of the most sensitive skin types. Many women with sensitive skin do not know why they suffer from sensitive skin. What does this really tell the skin care professional? Is the sensitivity because of cosmetic fragrances and / or preservatives? Is it triggered by ultraviolet exposure, allergens or pollutants? Perhaps it is a hereditary component that puts them at risk?

There are many types of “sensitive” skin reactions including dryness, itching, rashes and epidermal fissures. In order to minimize the chances of exacerbating sensitivity, avoid daily use of highly alkaline soaps that can be detrimental to preserving the integrity of the all important lipid layer. Gentle synthetic detergent or mild surfactant cleansers should be used.

People with sensitive skin should avoid stimulating and drying products and situations such as alcohol, scrub, heat, steam, sauna, hot water, direct heat on the face including from blow dryers, extreme environmental conditions, the sun and spicy foods. Irritants and sensitizing ingredients can be harsh detergents, chemicals, essential oils, fragrances, color agents and preservative. All of these can cause sensitive skin reactions. Fragrance additives are listed as the top offenders that cause many medical skin conditions such as rosacea, acne and atopic dermatitis. People with sensitive skin should use fragrance free products. For those to whom fragrance is important, skin care professionals suggest using a stand-alone fragrance applied to the hair only, not the skin.

Increased keratinization within the follicle

Regardless of ethnic background or skin color, hyperpigmentation is a condition that most people eventually will struggle with. Sun exposure causes darker pigmentation areas on the skin that we often want to diminish. Skin will either appear lighter or darken than normal with uneven patches of brown to dark discoloration or freckles. Skin pigmentation disorders occur because the body produces either too much or too little melanin. Melanin is the pigment produced by specific cells call melanocytes. It is triggered by an enzyme called tyrosinanse that creates the color of our skin, eyes, and hair. Melanin is our natural protection against the daily onslaught of ultraviolet exposure on skin. Melanin has two major forms that combine to create varying skin tones.

Eumelanin: the brown or black tinted melanin.

Pheomelanin: the yellow or red melanin that is more prevalent in blondes and redheads.

These pigments protect us because they deposit themselves closer to the surface of our skin in response to cuteneous inflammation, including that from sun exposure. Those with a higher percentage of eumelanin tend to be less subject to developing skin cancer, while those with a higher percentage of pheomelanin have a much greater risk of developing skin cancer. New research is indicating that exposure to ultraviolet rays can trigger sensitivity in the skin.

TREATMENT FOR SENSITIVE SKIN WITH PIGMENTATION

Treating pigmentation problems on sensitive Asian skin requires longer time than with other skin types. Because sensitive skin cannot handle strong brightening agents and because using a too strong treatment can damage and destroy superficial melanocytes, causing the pigment mark to return darker than before, it is difficult to manifest results while simultaneously protecting the skin with a safe treatment. Sensitive skin requires extra care and caution because pigmentation changes can be very obvious. Deep peel, laser, chemical peel, microdermabrasion and harsh exfoliating agents (scrub) are not recommended for sensitive skin. In treating pigmentation it is best to use safe ingredients such as: Retinyl Palmitate (vitamin A), Citric Acid, Citrus Medica Limonum (lemon extract), Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate or Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C). Use Arbutin (leaves of the bearberry shrub, cranberry) Licorice Rice Extract, Kojic Acid, and Azaleic Acid for lightening agents.

Full spectrum sunscreens that protect the skin from both UVA and UVB rays are a must, used conjunction with lightening pigmentation products. If not using sunscreen, pigmentation marks will return and become darker than before. Daily sunscreen is imperative for healthy skin. It protects the skin from UV rays. Sun exposure leads not only to skin cancer, but also to aging, hyperpigmentation, capillary damage, free radical damage, and collagen and elastin deterioration. Daily use of both sunscreen and moisturizers helps provide a protective layer on the face and body that aids in guarding against other environmental hazards such as pollution and dust that can harm the skin. The best way to minimize the effects of harmful environmental conditions is to protect your skin. To keep it in good shape, stay away from the sun as much as possible as ultraviolet rays can trigger sensitivity and pigmentation in the skin. Remember that with a darker shade of skin or hair, the more melanin content and the more sun protection is required for the skin to stay healthy.

CAUSES OF ACNE

Acne is a primary concern for many people. Acne is a skin disorder of the sebaceous glands, is characterized by comedones and blemishes, and is a hereditary trait that can be triggered by hormonal changes. Acne ranges from mild breakouts to disfiguring cysts and scarring. Acne can be controlled with a proper skin care regimen, helping clear up skin problems.

Causes of acne include the following:

Clogged Pores

Clogged Pores are caused by a number of factors, such as dead skin cells that do not shed from the follicles as they do on normal skin. Excessive sebum production causes additional cell buildup and blocks the follicle thus causing an acne breakout.

Bacteria

Bacteria in the follicles are anaerobic. This mean they cannot live in the presence of oxygen. When follicles are blocked with sebum and dead skin build up, oxygen cannot reach the bottom of the follicle, resulting in bacteria growth. Salicylic acid helps reduce the shedding of cells within the follicles, thus reducing impactions that exacerbate breakouts.

Cosmetics and Products

Certain ingredients in skin products can aggravate acne. Fatty ingredients such as waxes and oils can clog pores or irritate follicles. Comedogenic ingredients can cause cells to build up. Products rich in emollients and occlusive products are too heavy for problem skin types. Moisturizers and sunscreens should be water based.

Hormones

Of men's skin problems, one of the most common is acne. Male hormones known as androgens, stimulate sebaceous glands. High levels of the male hormone testosterone cause an increase in oil production and sweat. These hormones increase during puberty, when teen acne is first evident.

Male acne is not limited to the face. Acne bacteria can trigger eruptions any area on the body that has sebaceous glands, such as the chest, shoulders, and back. As men age, acne breakouts taper off because of the gradual decline of sebum production.

Adult acne is more common in females. Hormonal acne is often seen on the chin while cyclical breakouts are often in the perioral area. Hormonal acne may present itself at any stage in life when hormones fluctuate, such as during pregnancy, when using contraceptives, premenstrual changes, and menopause. In females acne is not severe because there is less testosterone production. Hormonal acne is more common in females in the first trimester of pregnancy during which time women produce more testosterone thus making breakouts common. Changes are noticeable as the pregnancy progresses with hormonal problems becoming more evident in the effects they have on the skin.

Stress

Stress causes hormonal fluctuations and increased sebum production. The adrenal gland responds to stress and secretes adrenalin, which helps us cope with stressful events. The male hormone androgen is produced by the adrenal gland stimulating the sebaceous gland. Unfortunately, when we have a big event and want to look our best, blemishes may appear because of the increased stress level and sebum production.

Food

Foods blamed for triggering acne may not affect it directly, although our eating habits do affect our bodies' functions. Examples are excessive iodides in salt, MSG, cheese, processed and packaged foods, especially fast foods. Eating fresh vegetables and fruits and increasing water intake seem to help those with acne experience fewer breakouts.

Irritations

Pressure or friction from rubbing or touching the face, phone use, or wearing hats can contribute to acne breakouts. Dirty pillows or makeup brushes also can transfer bacteria to the face. Keeping hands and items that touch the face clean can help keep the skin from breaking out.

Acne is broken into four grades. The number of lesions, comedones, papules, pustles, or cysts present determines the severity of the acne.

  • Grade I: Minor breakouts, mostly open comedones, some closed comedones, and a few papules and pustules.
  • Grade II: Many closed comedones, more open comedones, and more papules and pustules.
  • Grade III: Red and inflamed, many papules and pustules.
  • Grade IV: Cystic acne with comedones, papules, pustules, and inflammation are present.

TREATMENT OF ACNE

What can I do to control breakouts?

Acne ranges from mild breakouts to disfiguring cysts and scarring. Acne can be controlled with proper medication and skin care treatment. Acne can be a challenging problem making excellent skin care and hygiene vitally important. The first step is a cleanser to remove the excess oils and bacteria that are associated with acne, followed by a toner.

Exfoliate once or twice per week to remove dead skin cells, sebum, toxins, and the build up clogging debris. Following with acne treatment helps kill acne bacteria, control sebum production, and prevent breakouts and inflammation. “See recommended products below”

Step To Effectively Controlling Acne Breakouts

Increased keratinization within the follicle

Part of the acne disease pathway includes increased adherence of keratinocytes to the follicular wall and increased sebum production, resulting in a plugged pore. Skin cells often do not shed enough on their own, creating a build up in surfaces that traps oil and bacteria and thus causing the bacteria to proliferate. Products and treatment formulations containing Salicylic Acid, Azelaic Acid, Alpha Hydroxyl Acids, Retinyl Palmitate (vitamin A) and Retinol are ideal for helping address this major cause of acne.

Retinoids are the family of vitamin A derivatives that help to increase cellular proliferation and turnover, bringing healthy cells to the surface more quickly. Prescription strength retinoids like Retin-A can be irritating to some skin types, but may be necessary in treating certain grades of acne. Retinol is a more gently vitamin A derivative that is very effective and non-irritating to the skin. Using daily care products with low levels of retinol treatments allows for better skin function and improved cell turnover rate.

Increased sebum production

Controlling sebum production and bacteria build up can cause an inflammatory response.It is imperative to understand that over drying the skin, even over drying oily skin, will cause the skin to compensate by producing an excessive amount of sebum. This will cause even more breakouts as opposed to addressing the problem.

The following ingredients are the most effective in helping to control sebum production

Salicylic Acid or beta hydroxyl acid (BHA) is a multifunctional ingredient that addresses many of the systemic causes of blemishes, and also functions as an anti-inflammatory.

Ginger Root : wound healing properties.

Licorice Root : Anti-inflammatory properties

Cinnamon Bark : Anti-microbial and antioxidant, but it also can be a skin irritant.

Cucumber Extract : Anti-inflammatory and soothing properties.

Decrease Proliferation : Utilizing antibacterial and antimicrobial topical agents and oral or topical antibiotics (when applicable) are suitable ways to control the bacteria population.

The following are ingredients that decrease proliferation of acne causing bacteria

Salicylic Acid : Most effective over-the-counter choice for a topical antibacterial agent in the treatment of blemishes. It has the ability to penetrate into hair follicles to reach the bacteria that cause the problem and kill them.

Lactic Acid (AHA) : Alpha hydroxyl acid extracted from milk. It exfoliates cells on the surface of the skin by breaking down the material that holds skin cells together.

Kojic Acid : Is effective for inhibiting melanin production, is skin irritant and also skin lightening agent.

Azelaic Acid : Effective for treatment of acne and skin discoloration.

Tea Tree Oil : Effective against the bacteria that cause blemishes.

Control Inflammation

When the number of acne blemishes increases, sebum is broken down into irritating free fatty acids that stimulate an immune response and white blood cells weaken the follicular wall, resulting in rupture and increased inflammation. Utilizing anti-inflammatory topical ingredients will soothe current irritation and help to avoid future inflammation.

The following ingredients are effective in helping to control inflammation acne

Aloe Vera : An anti-irritant, wound healing agent and binder of moisture to the skin.

Panthenol (pro-vitamin B5) : Improves and increases the moisture retention capacity of the skin. It has anti-inflammatory and anti-itching effects.

Licorice Extract : Anti-inflammatory properties.

Green Tea : An antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties.

Acne Care Tips

Eliminate comedogenic products. Oil free does not mean non-comedogenic. Examine the ingredients on product labels to determine if they are correct for problem skin.

Control oil through proper product usage and avoid products those irritate the skin.

Exfoliate the follicles. Keep follicles clean and exfoliated to keep sebum and cells from building up. Effective ingredient such as: Beta hydroxyl acids (BHA) (salicylic acid).

Avoid environmental aggravators such as dirt, grease, sun, humidity, and pollution.

In addition, lifestyle changes can often improve your skin. Drink plenty of water, exercise, reduce stress and practice good nutritional habits. And always remember never to pick or squeeze pimples, avoid sun exposure as much as possible, and apply sunscreen with a minimum SPF 15. Never treat more often than the recommended frequency of treatment and avoid the daily use of irritating ingredients. Many products that help treat acne make the skin more sun sensitive, thereby increasing the risk for damage and post inflammatory hyper-pigmentation.

TREATMENTS FOR DRY SKIN

Dry skin is caused by the skin’s failure to produce oil. The follicles are usually small and the sebum is minimal. If pores are barely visible or they are too small, this indicates a dry skin type. The natural oil secretions in our follicles help protect us from environmental damage and aging. Dry skin needs extra care because it lacks this normal protection. Stimulating oil production and protecting the skin surface are imperative to taking care of dry skin. Occlusive products also protect the skin’s top barrier layer and hold in moisture, helping to combat dryness.

Dry skin tends to be dehydrated. It can feel scaly, rough, and itchy. It rarely has comedones, and when it does, they tend to be on the nose area.

The lack of oil in dry skin reduces its ability to retain moisture, since oil in the skin acts as a natural barrier against moisture loss. Dry skin is characterized as very fine, overly delicate, thin, and wrinkled, and is often filled with tiny superficial lines.

Dry skin problems are aggravated by exposure to the sun, wind, and heat. Improper skin care, especially the lack of protection against moisture loss, further exacerbates this problem. Care for dry skin should include the use of products that will stimulate skin functions, activate oil gland secretion, and provide deep hydration. Moisturizers that can form a “sealing” film on the skin surface will prevent or reduce moisture loss.

Moisturizing ingredients are also essential to activate the skin’s natural water retention ability and to place additional moisture into the skin. These ingredients are:

Ceramides: help generate and sustain the skin’s barrier function, improve skin hydration, and increase the feeling of softness.

Glycerin: It is water binding and able to draw and absorb water from the air, thus helping the skin retain moisture.

Shea Butter: protects the skin from dehydration.

Hyaluronic Acid: is a natural moisturizer and helps skin retain water.

Panthenol (Pro-Vitamin B-5): improves and increases the moisture retention capacity of the skin while promoting the formation and function of healthy cells

Honey Extract: is soothing, softening, and moisturizing.

Lanolin: in an emollient with moisturizing properties and an emulsifier with high water absorption capabilities.

CAUSES OF DRY SKIN

When the skin is not able to retain moisture and the level of the sebum decreases, it become very dry, rough, and red. Skin feels stretched, tight and uncomfortable and even itchy, especially the areas around the cheeks and lips. One of the major and most common problems is dehydration that can easily cause dry skin on the face. Drinking insufficient water throughout the day or consuming excess caffeine or sugary products, will almost certainly lead to dryness. Another main cause of dry skin is unhealthy eating habits.

DRY SKIN CARE TIPS

Use an oil-free moisturizer every day. Apply the cream to your face after your shower. Pat the skin dry then apply the moisturizer to your skin slightly damp face.

Avoid using soap; use fragrances free cleanser.

Avoid toner and aftershaves containing alcohol. Alcohol evaporates very quickly and cause the skin to dry out.

Avoid hot water.

Cleanse, tone, and moisturize each evening.

Don’t forget to apply sunscreen in the morning.

Drink as much water as possible. Water helps avoid dry skin, while also helping to reduce breakouts.

Eat plenty of fresh vegetables and fruit.

Avoid excessive exposure to direct sunlight and heat.

Install a humidifier in your home if you find the air to be excessively dry. A humidifier will keep the air moist, thus keeping your skin from drying out too much.

The goal in treating dry skin is to balance the moisture and oil of the skin. Use of products that contain ingredients that hold moisture, special serums and water based treatment creams such as the following are recommended.

COMBINATION SKIN

Combination skin occurs when two different skin types occur on the face at the same time. Combination skin is when some areas are oily and some areas are dry. The oily areas are located on the T-zone, i.e. the forehead, nose and chin. Cheeks are usually more on the dry side, but the degrees of oiliness and dryness can vary. The T-zone also tends to have larger pores and is prone to breakouts, while the cheeks may feel rough and irritated.

TEST COMBINATION SKIN

Not sure if you have combination skin? Take a tissue and press it against your face. If there’s oil on the tissue where it touched your T-zone, but no oil where the tissue touched you cheeks, you most likely have combination skin.

WHAT CAUSES COMBINATION SKIN

A variety of factors contribute to combination skin. Sometimes it is just genetics. When it comes to combination skin, the causes and combinations are a little bit different for everyone. Generally, the areas around the nose, chin, and forehead have more active oil glands than other parts of the face. Some people have rosacea and dry skin and others have blemish-prone, flaky, inflamed skin. Combination skin also can be a result of the very skin care products you are using. For example, if you are using products that contain irritating ingredients, they can stimulate oil production in the T zone area and at the same time create more dry skin and redness on the rest of the face. Also you may be using moisturizers that are too emollient, making your skin fell oiler and clogging up pores. All the products you use have to be appropriate for the different skin types you are experiencing even if that means different products on different parts of your face. The following are causes of combination skin.

Hormonal changes: can leads to changes in skin’s oiliness or dryness. Teens and young adults tend to have oilier skin, especially in the T-zone. But, with age, hormones change due to menstruation and the birth control pill, which can make skin oilier in certain areas.

Lipids: also play a role in combination skin. These proteins affect skin’s softness and feel. When lipids are not evenly spread throughout the skin, certain areas will feel drier and rougher, while other areas may feel soft but oily or greasy. The organization of lipids in skin is due to genetics and hormones.

Weather: can exacerbate combination skin. Dry, cold weather can cause skin to lose moisture and become irritated. Hot humid weather can increase oil production. This can affect your T-zone as well as your cheeks.

TREATMENT FOR SENSITIVE SKIN WITH PIGMENTATION

Treating pigmentation problems on sensitive Asian skin requires longer time than with other skin types. Because sensitive skin cannot handle strong brightening agents and because using a too strong treatment can damage and destroy superficial melanocytes, causing the pigment mark to return darker than before, it is difficult to manifest results while simultaneously protecting the skin with a safe treatment. Sensitive skin requires extra care and caution because pigmentation changes can be very obvious. Deep peel, laser, chemical peel, microdermabrasion and harsh exfoliating agents (scrub) are not recommended for sensitive skin. In treating pigmentation it is best to use safe ingredients such as: Retinyl Palmitate (vitamin A), Citric Acid, Citrus Medica Limonum (lemon extract), Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate or Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C). Use Arbutin (leaves of the bearberry shrub, cranberry) Licorice Rice Extract, Kojic Acid, and Azaleic Acid for lightening agents.

Full spectrum sunscreens that protect the skin from both UVA and UVB rays are a must, used conjunction with lightening pigmentation products. If not using sunscreen, pigmentation marks will return and become darker than before. Daily sunscreen is imperative for healthy skin. It protects the skin from UV rays. Sun exposure leads not only to skin cancer, but also to aging, hyperpigmentation, capillary damage, free radical damage, and collagen and elastin deterioration. Daily use of both sunscreen and moisturizers helps provide a protective layer on the face and body that aids in guarding against other environmental hazards such as pollution and dust that can harm the skin. The best way to minimize the effects of harmful environmental conditions is to protect your skin. To keep it in good shape, stay away from the sun as much as possible as ultraviolet rays can trigger sensitivity and pigmentation in the skin. Remember that with a darker shade of skin or hair, the more melanin content and the more sun protection is required for the skin to stay healthy.

MEN'S SKINCARE

A man’s face can tell his age, reflecting how well he has cared for it over the years. The first step in caring for men’s skin is to understand how the skin functions. Men’s skin looks thicker, sturdier, oilier and more porous than women’s skin. It also seems to have more color because of higher melanin content and to be dryer due to shaving.

Once a man reaches the age of 30 his testosterone production begins to gradually decline, which in turn causes collagen and oil production to slow down. The decrease continues through adulthood until men reach andropause. By the time a man reaches age 60 his collagen level drops so significantly that the skin becomes softer, saggier, dryer, and visibly wrinkled due to the lack of collagen fibers supporting it.

External influences also can speed up the aging process of skin. Factors such as smoking, drinking, pollution, poor diet and environment take the most visible toll on men’s skin. Too much sun and not enough protection accelerate the aging process; prolonged sun exposure leads to hyperpigmentation, wrinkles and an increased risk of skin cancer.

Men’s most common skin problem is acne. Because male skin produces more oil and sweat, it is more prone to acne than female skin. Male acne is not limited to the face but can be anywhere on the body, particularly on the shoulders, back and chest. Acne occurs when pores become plugged, resulting in blackheads and pimples.

Rosacea is a chronic condition that causes redness around the cheeks, chin, nose and forehead. Rosacea seems to be linked to the vascular network of the central facial skin and causes redness, bumps, pimples, and other systems that rarely extend beyond the face. Rosacea cannot be cured, but its systems can be controlled and in some cases eliminated.

Psoriasis is a genetic, autoimmune disease that affects skin. Once the disease is triggered, the skin cells pile up on the surface of the body faster than normal. Normal skin cells mature and are shed about every 28 days. When Psoriasis is present, skin cells rise to the surface of the skin in three to six days. The body cannot shed the skin cells quickly enough, resulting in dry, itchy patches of lesions on the surface of the skin. The average onset of Psoriasis in men is 22 years of age. Topical and systemic treatments provide only temporary relief.

Men’s skin ages better than women’s skin because men exfoliate every day when shaving. The act of shaving also helps keep facial muscles toned as they move the mouth and chin around to accommodate the razor’s path. Following shaving men must avoid alcohol based facial products. Alcohol can sensitize and dry skin. Shaving balms or lotions should include ingredients such as squalane and vitamin E, to hydrate skin and promote healing.

Facial hair potentially can be a source of skin problems for men. Facial hair left behind after shaving can spring back and grow into the skin instead of out. Improper shaving also may cause folliculitis (ingrown hairs). When the hair grows slightly under the skin and is trapped it can cause a bacterial infection. The skin becomes red, irritated and inflamed; red bump marks can cause scarring and hyperpigmentation if left untreated. The treatment goal for this condition is to alleviate the irritation, to dry up and disinfect the pustules, and to desensitize the area. A wet mask such as Green Tea, Ginseng, or Caviar Collagen Mask, is the most comfortable product available to treat and keep the follicles clean. Exfoliating with a product such as Brightening Exfoliant Powder is necessary to keep the follicles open.

No matter how busy a lifestyle he leads, no man can afford not to take a few extra minutes each day for preventative skin care. Men’s skin does need attention to look its best and to stay healthy. A few simple skin care steps can easily be incorporated into a man’s daily shaving routine. Men should not use regular soap as a facial wash. These harsh soaps dry the skin and, consequently, create an overproduction of oil that can lead to blackheads and breakouts. Recommended are specially formulated cleansers such as:

TREATMENT FOR SENSITIVE SKIN WITH PIGMENTATION

Treating pigmentation problems on sensitive Asian skin requires longer time than with other skin types. Because sensitive skin cannot handle strong brightening agents and because using a too strong treatment can damage and destroy superficial melanocytes, causing the pigment mark to return darker than before, it is difficult to manifest results while simultaneously protecting the skin with a safe treatment. Sensitive skin requires extra care and caution because pigmentation changes can be very obvious. Deep peel, laser, chemical peel, microdermabrasion and harsh exfoliating agents (scrub) are not recommended for sensitive skin. In treating pigmentation it is best to use safe ingredients such as: Retinyl Palmitate (vitamin A), Citric Acid, Citrus Medica Limonum (lemon extract), Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate or Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C). Use Arbutin (leaves of the bearberry shrub, cranberry) Licorice Rice Extract, Kojic Acid, and Azaleic Acid for lightening agents.

Full spectrum sunscreens that protect the skin from both UVA and UVB rays are a must, used conjunction with lightening pigmentation products. If not using sunscreen, pigmentation marks will return and become darker than before. Daily sunscreen is imperative for healthy skin. It protects the skin from UV rays. Sun exposure leads not only to skin cancer, but also to aging, hyperpigmentation, capillary damage, free radical damage, and collagen and elastin deterioration. Daily use of both sunscreen and moisturizers helps provide a protective layer on the face and body that aids in guarding against other environmental hazards such as pollution and dust that can harm the skin. The best way to minimize the effects of harmful environmental conditions is to protect your skin. To keep it in good shape, stay away from the sun as much as possible as ultraviolet rays can trigger sensitivity and pigmentation in the skin. Remember that with a darker shade of skin or hair, the more melanin content and the more sun protection is required for the skin to stay healthy.